Category

Immunisation

2017 Influenza immunisation

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Government funded vaccinations are available for:
Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children aged 6 months to <5 years
Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander persons aged ≥15 years
All persons aged ≥65 years
All persons aged ≥6 months who have certain medical conditions which increase the risk of influenza disease complications; for example, severe asthma, lung or heart disease, low immunity or diabetes.
Pregnant women (during any stage of pregnancy).

Patients who are not eligible for the government funded vaccination are able to purchase the vaccine for $15.

Please call 44762999 for further information.

Whooping cough immunisation

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Whooping Cough (pertussis) is an extremely contagious respiratory infection which causes uncontrolled coughing and vomiting and can be particularly dangerous for babies under the age of 12 months.

Whooping cough is spread through respiratory droplets, which can be transmitted in the air through coughing and sneezing, or from close contact with an infected person. In a household where someone has whooping cough, an estimated 80-90% of the non-immunised contacts of that person will acquire whooping cough.

A history of having this disease does not mean life-long immunity, therefore vaccination is still necessary. Whooping cough vaccination is available for free to children through the National Immunisation Program Schedule and to pregnant women in their third trimester (preferably at 28 weeks) and is available at the surgery. Family members and people who have close contact with babies in the first weeks of life are recommended to have a whooping cough vaccine 2 weeks before having contact with the baby – this is available on prescription from a doctor.

For more information on whooping cough and the whooping cough vaccine:

http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/Infectious/factsheets/Pages/pertussis.aspx

http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/immunise-pertussis

Shingles immunisation

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Shingles (Herpes-zoster) is a painful blistering rash caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster (chickenpox) virus. The shingles rash occurs when the dormant chickenpox virus is reactivated in the nerve tissue, causing inflammation of the nerves

Once you have had chickenpox, the virus can stay in your nervous system for many years and can become active again and give you shingles. Shingles can spread through direct contact with an uncovered rash. 1 in 3 people will develop shingles in their lifetime. As a person gets older, the risk of getting shingles increases.

The shingles vaccine is provided free for people aged 70 years under the National Immunisation Program. There is also a five year catch-up program for people aged 71 – 79 years until 31 October 2021. If you are eligible and would like to receive a free shingles vaccine, please call and book an appointment with our Practice Nurses. Please be aware that this vaccine is not safe for people who have a compromised immune system.

If you are not eligible to receive the free vaccine, you are able to purchase the vaccine on prescription – a doctor appointment is required.

For more information on the shingles vaccine:

http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/immunise-herpes-zoster

http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/immunisation/Pages/adult_vaccination.aspx#shingles